EXITING FAR EAST

Truly Asia
 

  • Thailand of asia
  • Malaysia of asia
  • Singapore of asia
  • Hong kong of asia
  • Macau of asia

Thailand

There are five regions of Thailand: North, Northeast, East, Central, and South, which are divided into 75+1 provinces, each geographically distinct from the others; each Thailand province contains unique cultural, historical, and natural attractions from the northern peaks (replete with wildlife and home to exotic hill tribes) and the central plains (the “Rice Bowl of Asia”) to the northeastern plateau (stretching to the Mekong River border with Laos) and the spectacular beaches and islands of the south (including both Phuket and Samui).This Thailand travel guide can help you plan where to go by providing information about dining and accommodation, Thailand tourist attractions, regional festivals and events, different activities in each of the Thailand provinces, and unique shopping products produced in different regions of Thailand.

Thailand's rainy season, monsoons, arrive around July and last into November. This is followed by a dry, cool period from November to mid-February, followed by much higher relative temperatures from March to June.By far the best time to visit is from February to March when the weather is kind and the beaches are at their finest.The peak seasons are August, November, December, February and March, with secondary peak months in January and July. If your main objective is to avoid crowds and to take advantage of discounted rooms and low-season rates, you should consider travelling during the least crowded months (April, May, June, September and October). On the other hand it's not difficult to leave the crowds behind, even during peak months, if you simply avoid some of the most popular destinations (eg, Chiang Mai and all islands and beaches).

Geography
Located in the center of Southeast Asia, Thailand is truly at the heart of the region. Looking over a map of Thailand will reveal a country whose borders form the rough shape of an elephant’s head: the head and ears forming the mostly landlocked northern and eastern provinces and the trunk extending down the Malaysian peninsula between the Andaman Sea and the Gulf of Thailand.The geography of Thailand features many natural borders with neighboring countries: a mountainous border with Myanmar (Burma) to the north and west; a long stretch of the Mekong River separating Thailand from Laos to the north and east; and the Mekong River and the Dongrak Mountains delineating the border of Cambodia to the east. Covering an area of approximately 514,000 square kilometers (200,000 sq miles), Thailand is the 50th largest country in the world, most nearly equal in size to Spain. Located just 15 degrees north of the equator, Thailand has a tropical climate and temperatures typically range from 19 to 38 degrees C (66-100 F); monsoon rains fall predominately from May to July and cooler, drier weather occurs around November and December.

Despite the geographical boundaries of Thailand all falling within the tropics, Thailand’s four primary regions are each geographically distinct from each other.Along Thailand’s western border with Myanmar, the forested mountains of Thailand rise higher as they stretch north, peaking at the 2,565 meter (8,415 ft) Doi Inthanon. Thailand’s northern peaks are replete with wildlife and feature Thailand’s coolest winters.Northeastern Thailand’s geography, where the kingdom borders Laos at the Mekong River, features the Khorat Plateau, which extends south towards the Thai border with Cambodia. The Isan region of Northeastern Thailand is the most populous region of Thailand (with the exception of Bangkok) and features a number of bustling provincial capital cities.The geography of Thailand’s interior is dominated by the Central Plains, the “Rice Bowl of Asia,” through which the Chao Phraya River feeds expansive rice fields and then enters the bustling capital of Bangkok before spilling into the Gulf of Thailand.

Stretching down the Malaysian peninsula, the slender trunk of the figurative elephant separates the Andaman Sea from the Gulf of Thailand, providing Thailand with beaches and islands along opposing shores. Once, the sheltered coves of the narrow Isthmus of Kra were important ports along an ancient, strategic trading route; today the islands of Phuket and Koh Samui are equally important as tourist destinations, though both coasts also contain numerous historical attractions as well as national parks, wildlife sanctuaries, and spectacular forests, waterfalls, and beaches.In addition to these natural, geographical regions, Thailand is divided into 76 political provinces, with Bangkok serving as the political, commercial, industrial, educational, and entertainment capital of the country.

Religion
While roughly 95% of the Thai people are practitioners of Theravada Buddhism, the official religion of Thailand, religious tolerance is both customary in Thailand and protected by the constitution. By its very nature however, Buddhism, which is based on the teachings of the Buddha, “the enlightened one” (nee Siddhartha Gautama), is a compassionate and tolerant religion, the aim of which is the alleviation of suffering. Consequently, Thai people are very respectful of the religious beliefs of others and are very open toward discussing their Buddhist values with visitors. In fact, there are many opportunities in Thailand to visit Buddhist temples to learn about or study Buddhism and perhaps to learn to meditate.

Religion in Thailand pervades many aspects of Thai life and senior monks are highly revered; it is not uncommon to see their images adorning walls of businesses or homes or upon ornaments inside of taxi cabs. In many towns and villages the neighborhood wat (temple) is the heart of social and religious life. Buddhist holidays occur regularly throughout the year (particularly on days with full moons) and many Thai people go to the wat on these and other important days to pay homage to the Buddha and give alms to monks in order to make merit for themselves.

Meditation, one of the primary practices of Buddhism, is a means of self reflection in order to identify the causes of individual desire and ultimately alleviate ones suffering. Visitors can learn the fundamentals of this practice at a number of wats across the kingdom. Some temples, particularly in Chiang Mai, allow visitors to chat with monks in order to gain general knowledge about Buddhism or to study Buddhism more seriously.

While Theravada Buddhism may technically be considered a philosophy rather than a religion (there is no ‘God’) Thai Buddhism is infused with many spiritual beliefs which are likely the result of lingering animist and Hindu beliefs from centuries earlier. Most Thai homes and places of business feature a ‘spirit house’ just outside the building, where offerings are made to appease spirits that might otherwise inhabit their homes or workplaces. Furthermore, Buddhist monks are often brought to new homes and businesses to ‘bless them’, and Thai people frequently light incense and make prayers to both Buddha images and a host of Hindu gods whose shrines are located throughout Bangkok and the countryside.

The next largest religion in Thailand, Islam, is practiced by only about 4% of the population; the majority of Thai Muslims live in the most southerly provinces near the Malaysian border. Other religions in Thailand include Hinduism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Christianity, which are generally practiced by those living in Bangkok, where a multi-cultural population includes citizens of Indian, Chinese, Japanese, and European descent.

Culture
Thai culture is Buddhist. Accordingly the culture is one where individuals are taught to think for themselves and not be subjugated by religious authorities as is the case with Christain, Jewish or Muslim religions.

The essence of this culture has two principal themes, first, one must understand the difference between reality and self delusion, and second, one must understand the nature of cause and effect, that is, to understand whatever one does now will have implications later, not only in the very short term, but the very long term.

In Thai society Thai culture is such that people do not mix self delusion in their thoughts and conversation. This is seen as foolish. Good examples of self delusion include arrogance, superiority beliefs, social status etc. Some cultures do not make the distinction. The distinction is made in business matters as well as private relationships. Thai culture enables Thai people to better self distinguish their emotional desires with a cautious respect for reality.

Thai culture also calls for detachment. In some societies if people want something they have to have it whatever, in fact they strive to become part of what they seek, be it a status symbol object like a motor car or a position of social recognition. They become in their minds what they seek to obtain, the delusion is over whelming. In Thai culture such desire and attachment for objects is regarded as weekness.

To this we add the need for respect of others also a concept not really understood in western cultures. Examples of this respect are, not to shout at others, not to talk at some one, rather talk to them, not to impose on another with meaningless and convoluted talk [ thus wasting their time ], not to defame someone and respect their property in their own good name. For example, defamation is a crime in Thailand.

Tourist Attraction

Bangkok
Bangkok has dominated Thailand's urban hierarchy as well as its political, commercial and cultural life since the late 18th century. Although you can shop in air-conditioned comfort in its Western-style malls, the city is a long way from being tamed by commercial homogeneity.

Bangkok's history of haphazard planning means you'll have the best experiences in the most unlikely of places. Just when you start despairing at the predominance of concrete and cars, a waft of incense leads you to a serene temple in an area you'd written off as soulless.

Pattaya
Pattaya is a lovely city of Thailand which is situated in east coast of Gulf of Thailand, Pattaya is located 165 Kms from Thailand, Most of the Pattaya residents are Thai-Chinese ancestry , But because of Tourism Pattaya has lots of retirees living in Pattaya ,As Pattaya Thai immigration has a special visa category for foreigners over age of fifty years who want to retire in Thailand.

Pattaya has tropical wet & dry climate,which is devided in seasons like hot & humid (March to May) and Hot & Rainy (June to October) , Warm and dry (November - February), Average highest temperature is 32 degree celcius and Minimum temperature of 23 degree celcius.

Ayuthaya Historical Park
A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Ayuthaya's historic temples are scattered throughout this once magnificent city and along the encircling rivers. Several of the more central ruins – Wat Phra Si Sanphet, Wat Mongkhon Bophit, Wat Na Phra Meru, Wat Thammikarat, Wat Ratburana and Wat Phra Mahathat – can be visited on foot.

You could add more temples and ruins to your itinerary by touring the city on a rented bicycle. An ideal transport combination for visitors who want to see everything would be to hire a bicycle for the central temples and charter a long-tail boat to take a tour of the outlying ruins along the river.

Chiang Mai
Chiang Mai has a striking mountain backdrop, over 300 temples and a quaint historical aura. It's also a modern, friendly, internationally-flavoured city with much to offer the visitor - food, accommodation and shopping are all top quality and cheap, and the nights are relatively cool. Chiang Mai's plethora of temples will probably exhaust you before you exhaust them. For variety, try a wander round the night bazaar, acquaint yourself with local culture at the musuems, or practice your Buddhist calm under a palm tree in the city's gardens.

Ko Samui
This beautiful island off southeastern Thailand is covered with coconut plantations and circled by (call us clichéd but it's true) palm-fringed beaches. It was once an 'untouched' backpackers' mecca, but is now well on its way to becoming a fully-fledged tourist resort. The most popular beaches are Hat Chaweng and Hat Lamai: both have good swimming and snorkelling but are getting a little crowded. For more peace and quiet, try Mae Nam, Bo Phut and Big Buddha on the northern coast. The main town on the island is Na Thon.

Nakhon Pathom
Nakhon Pathom, west of Bangkok, is regarded as the oldest city in Thailand and is host to the 127m (417ft), orange-tiled Phra Pathom Chedi, the tallest Buddhist monument in the world. The original monument, buried within the massive dome, was erected in the 6th century by Theravada Buddhists.

Chachoengsao
Tucked away in the countryside to the east of Bangkok, this provincial town is hardly visited by foreign tourists, mainly because it's not on the major road or rail networks out of the capital. It's home to one of the most sacred Buddha images in Thailand - Phra Phuttha Sothon. Housed in the Wat Sothon Wararam Worawihaan, the origins of the modest 198cm (77in) Buddha are cloaked in mystery but the image is said to be associated with a famous monk with holy powers who supposedly predicted the exact moment of his death. Chachoengsao makes a great day-trip destination.

Mae Sot
In northern Tak Province, close to the Burmese border, Mae Sot has a reputation as a frontier town with an outlaw image. It has a thriving black-market trade (guns, narcotics, teak and gems) and is an increasingly important official jade and gem centre.An interesting mixture of ethnicities have shacked-up here- Burmese Muslims, members of the local Karen hill tribes, Chinese and Indian shopkeepers and poppy-clad Thai army rangers. It's a departure point for the fascinating border markets that trade Burmese handicrafts and food stuffs.

Phuket
Phuket Island, off the southwest coast of tropical Thailand, has become one of the world’s most exciting locations for a wonderful holiday. Phuket is located approximately 862 kilometres south of Bangkok. There are only two seasons in a year the green season ( May to October) and the hot season (November to April) .The numerous broad white sand beaches and central mountain range with tropical vegetation have made this island the place discerning sophisticated buyers of luxury homes have chosen as their destination for retirement or vacation. Much of the charm of the island is its diverse culture. Over the centuries the island has attracted people from many cultures due to its location on the trade routes between India and China. The Portuguese had a substantial settlement on the island in the seventeenth century followed by a large migration of Chinese to work in the tin mines and rubber plantations. This combination of nationalities is responsible for the architecture in temples and shop houses that has become known as Sino-Portuguese.Tourism was not a local industry until the island was featured in an early James Bond film which showcased the unsurpassed beaches, warm tropical sea and stunning limestone formations that are sprinkled around Phang Nga Bay. The Tourism industry has been affected by the Tsunami, however, recent accounts in the press of charter flights from Europe resuming in the high season, and reports from hotel operators that they are fully booked in the peak of the high season shows a good recovery of tourism on the island.

Thailand is becoming as easy as many other locations in the world. Communications and IT infrastructure in Thailand are among the best in South East Asia. Telephone (both landline and mobile) and Internet access within Thailand is of high quality and very cheap when compared with the same services in neighboring countries.As with Thailand in general, the business infrastructure in Phuket is ver y good. Telephone and Internet systems are of high quality and are cost effective, making business easy to conduct from anywhere on the island. Phuket attracts business people who can work from home and stay connected to their offices anywhere in the world. Future plans include turning Phuket into an IT business hub for Central South East Asia.The island has a rich variety of entertainment options. There is a lot of fun waiting for everyone from the world class Phuket FantaSea theme show to the late night entertainment of Patong, or a romantic moonlight stroll on the beach.Restaurants featuring Thai and International cuisine as well as international franchise outlets offer inexpensive yet tasty foods. Large shopping centers provide all the foods, books, clothes and movie theaters found in major cities.Phuket is also a great base for yachting, snorkeling, having an adventure on an elephant or just resting by the seaside. The island is an international playground unmatched in surrounding Southeast Asia.

GETTTING TO THAILAND

BY AIR
The flight distance from India to Thailand is: 1,555 miles / 2,502 km.

Malaysia
The two parts of Malaysia, separated from each other by the South China Sea, share a largely similar landscape in that both Peninsular and East Malaysia feature coastal plains rising to hills and mountains. Peninsular Malaysia, containing 40 per cent of Malaysia's land area, extends 740 kilometers (460 mi) from north to south, and its maximum width is 322 kilometers (200 mi). It is divided between its east and west coasts by the Titiwangsa Mountains, part of a series of mountain ranges running down the centre of the peninsula. These mountains are heavily forested, and mainly composed of granite and other igneous rocks. Much of it has been eroded, creating a karst landscape. The range is the origin of some of Peninsular Malaysia's river systems. The coastal plains surrounding the peninsula reach a maximum width of 50 kilometers (31 mi), and the peninsula's coastline is nearly 1,931 kilometers (1,200 mi) long, although harbours are only available on the western side.

National Park, Pahang
East Malaysia, on the island of Borneo, has a coastline of 2,607 kilometers (1,620 mi). It is divided between coastal regions, hills and valleys, and a mountainous interior. The Crocker Range extends northwards from Sarawak, dividing the state of Sabah. It is the location of the 4,095.2 meters (13,436 ft) high Mount Kinabalu, the tallest mountain in Malaysia. Mount Kinabalu is protected as the Kinabalu National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The highest mountain ranges from the border between Malaysia and Indonesia. Sarawak contains the Mulu Caves, the largest cave system in the world.

Around these two halves of Malaysia are numerous islands, the largest of which is Banggi. The local climate is equatorial and characterized by the annual southwest (April to October) and northeast (October to February) monsoons. The temperature is moderated by the presence of the surrounding oceans. Humidity is usually high, and the average annual rainfall is 250 centimeters (98 in). The climates of the Peninsula and the East differ, as the climate on the peninsula is directly affected by wind from the mainland, as opposed to the more maritime weather of the East. Local climates can be divided into three regions, highland, lowland, and coastal. Climate change is likely to affect sea levels and rainfall, increasing flood risks and leading to droughts.

Religion
The Malaysian constitution guarantees freedom of religion while making Islam the state religion. According to the Population and Housing Census 2010 figures, ethnicity and religious beliefs correlate highly. Approximately 61.3% of the population are practicing Islam. 19.8% practice Buddhism; 9.2% Christianity; 6.3% Hinduism; and 1.3% practice Confucianism, Taoism and other traditional Chinese religions. 0.7% declared no religion and the remaining 1.4% practised other religions or did not provide any information. All ethnic Malays are considered Muslim by law of the Constitution.

Statistics from the 2010 Census indicate that 83.6% of the Chinese population identify as Buddhist, with significant numbers of adherents following Taoism (3.4%) and Christianity (11.1%), along with small Hui-Muslim populations in areas like Penang. The majority of the Indian population follow Hinduism (86.2%), with a significant minority identifying as Christians (6.0%) or Muslims (4.1%). Christianity is the predominant religion of the non-Malay bumiputra community (46.5%) with an additional 40.4% identifying as Muslims.

Indira Gandhi Airport Delhi, India To Kuala Lumpur Airport, Malaysia - 5,727 K.M.

Culture
Malaysia has a multi-ethnic, multicultural, and multilingual society. The original culture of the area stemmed from indigenous tribes that inhabited it, along with the Malays who later moved there. Substantial influence exists from Chinese and Indian culture, dating back to when foreign trade began. Other cultural influences include the Persian, Arabic, and British cultures. Due to the structure of the government, coupled with the social contract theory, there has been minimal cultural assimilation of ethnic minorities.
In 1971, the government created a "National Cultural Policy", defining Malaysian culture. It stated that Malaysian culture must be based on the culture of the indigenous peoples of Malaysia, that it may incorporate suitable elements from other cultures, and that Islam must play a part in it. It also promoted the Malay language above others. This government intervention into culture has caused resentment among non-Malays who feel their cultural freedom was lessened. Both Chinese and Indian associations have submitted memorandums to the government, accusing it of formulating an undemocratic culture policy.

Some cultural disputes exist between Malaysia and neighbouring countries, notably Indonesia. The two countries have a similar cultural heritage, sharing many traditions and items. However, disputes have arisen over things ranging from culinary dishes to Malaysia's national anthem. Strong feelings exist in Indonesia about protecting their national heritage. The Malaysian government and the Indonesian government have met to defuse some of the tensions resulting from the overlaps in culture. Feelings are not as strong in Malaysia, where most recognise that many cultural values are shared.

Tourist Attraction

Kuala Lumpur
To describe Kuala Lumpur is like opening a book that has various exciting chapters. Yes, this only global city of Malaysia appears blessed with colors of modernism along with rich heritage. Though formally KL spans over an area of 244 sq kms, its plush precincts virtually get bigger to embrace the entire world. There are so many places to visit for tourist like Islamic Arts Museum, Petronas Twin Tower, Kuala Lumpur City Centre (KLCC), Kuala Lumpur Bird Park, Kenko Fish Spa, Royal Selangor Pewter Factory and Visitor Centre, Menara Kuala Lumpur Tower, Lake Gardens Park, Aquaria KLCC and much more.

Kelantan
Kelantan-literally meaning "Land of Lightning"-is an agrarian state with lush paddy fields, rustic fishing villagesand casuarina-lined beaches. Located in the northeast corner of the peninsula, the charms of Kelantan are found in the vitality of its culture and its remote, unsullied beauty. Kelantan offers plenty of opportunities for tourists such as river cruises, river rafting, bird watching and jungle trekking.

Malacca
Malacca is a quiet seaside city located on the West Coast of Peninsular Malaysia facing the Straits of Malacca, about 147 km from Kuala Lumpur. Malacca is a wonderful repository of its cultural heritage. Its colonial past is evident in its Portuguese architecture, where as on the streets, Chinese influence is most visible. Most of the businessmen here are Chinese.

Negeri Sembilian
Negeri Sembilian literally means "Nine States". It is so called because it comprises a federation of nine states. Located on the southwest corner of Peninsular Malaysia, Negeri Sembilan encompasses an area of 6,645 sq km and a 48 km long coastline.

Penang
Penang, literally meaning Island of Betel Nut, is famous for its natural scenic beauty. Also known as the 'Pearl of Orient', Penang entices visitors with its warm seas, golden beaches, lush greenery and delicious cuisine.

Perlis
Perlis is the smallest state in Malaysia. The state is famous for its serene unspoilt beauty, rustic rural scenes and verdant paddy fields. The expanse of verdant paddy fields makes the landscape appear like a huge canvas of brilliant green or gold, depending on the season.

Sabah
Sabah is a tropical paradise located at the northeast corner of Borneo. In ancient times it was known as the "Land Below the Wind" because it lies below the typhoon belt. Sabah attracts visitors with its scenic beauty, rugged landscape and cultural diversity.

Sarawak
Sarawak-the largest state of Malaysia-is better known as the land of fabled White Rajahs, the hornbill and the orangutan. Located on the northwestern shore of the island of Borneo, Sarawak is a preferred tourist destination for those seeking culture, nature and adventure tourism. The rainforests of Sarawak are home to the richest and most diverse ecosystem of the world.

Terengganu
Terengganu is one of the three east coast states on Peninsular Malaysia. Terengganu is the repository of Malaysia's cultural heritage and is home to the lilting Gamelan and the mesmerizing "Ulek Mayang" dance. It is a serene state, with numerous small villages, quiet roads, and secluded islands and beaches.

Singapore
Singapore officially the Republic of Singapore, is a Southeast Asian city-state off the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, 137 kilometres north of the equator. An island country made up of 63 islands, it is separated from Malaysia by the Straits of Johor to its north and from Indonesia's Riau Islands by the Singapore Strait to its south. Singapore consists of 63 islands, including the main island, widely known as Singapore Island but also as Pulau Ujong. There are two man-made connections to Johor, Malaysia: the Johor–Singapore Causeway in the north, and the Tuas Second Link in the west. Jurong Island, Pulau Tekong, Pulau Ubin and Sentosa are the largest of Singapore's smaller islands. The highest natural point is Bukit Timah Hill at 166 m (545 ft). Singapore has a tropical rainforest climate with no distinctive seasons, uniform temperature and pressure, high humidity, and abundant rainfall. Temperatures usually range from 23 to 32 °C (73 to 90 °F). Relative humidity averages around 79% in the morning and 73% in the afternoon. April and May are the hottest months, with the wetter monsoon season from November to January. From July to October, there is often haze caused by bush fires in neighbouring Indonesia.Although Singapore does not observe daylight saving time, it follows time zone GMT+8, one hour ahead of its geographical location.

Singapore is the perfect destination for you if you find sun and heat your best friends. If sunbathing, swimming, or sailing gives you a picture of a perfect vacation, then there would be no better match for you than this southeast nation. Singapore, located to the north of equator, has a tropical type of climate. The main features of the climate of Singapore are uniform temperature and pressure, high humidity and abundant rainfall. The geographical location and influence of the sea exert a great impact on the weather conditions of Singapore. The state receives an annual average rainfall of around 2,370 mm. The eastern part of Singapore falls under the rain shadow region and thus, receives less rainfall than the western side.

Religion
Buddhism is the most widely-practised religion in Singapore, with 33% of the resident population declaring themselves adherents at the most recent census. The next largest religious demographics, in order of size, are Christianity, non-religious, Islam, Taoism and Hinduism. The proportion of Christians, Taoists and non-religious people increased between 2000 and 2010 by about 3% each, while the proportion of Buddhists decreased. Other faiths remained largely stable in their share of the population. There are monasteries and Dharma centres from all three major traditions of Buddhism in Singapore: Theravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana. Most Buddhists in Singapore are Chinese and are of the Mahayana tradition. Chinese Mahayana is the most predominant form of Buddhism in Singapore, with missionaries from Taiwan and China for several decades. However, Thailand's Theravada Buddhism has seen growing popularity among the people (not only the Chinese) in the past decade. Soka Gakkai International, a Japanese Buddhist organisation, is practised by many people in Singapore, but by mostly those of Chinese descent. Tibetan Buddhism has also made slow inroads into the country in recent years.

Culture
Singapore is a cosmopolitan society where people live harmoniously and interaction among different races are commonly seen. The pattern of Singapore stems from the inherent cultural diversity of the island. The immigrants of the past have given the place a mixture of Malay, Chinese, Indian, and European influences, all of which have intermingled.Behind the facade of a modern city, these ethnic races are still evident. The areas for the different races, which were designated to them by Sir Stamford Raffles, still remain although the bulk of Singaporeans do think of themselves as Singaporeans, regardless of race or culture. Each still bears its own unique character.

The old streets of Chinatown can still be seen; the Muslim characteristics are still conspicuous in Arab Street; and Little India along Serangoon Road still has its distinct ambience. Furthermore, there are marks of the British colonial influence in the Neo-Classical buildings all around the city. Each racial group has its own distinctive religion and there are colorful festivals of special significance all year round. Although the festivals are special to certain races, it is nonetheless enjoyed by all.In Singapore, food is also readily and widely available. There are lots of cuisines to offer. We have, Chinese, Indian, Malay, Indonesian and Western, Italian, Peranakan, Spanish, French, Thai and even Fusion. It is very common to savour other culture's food and some of the food can be very intriguing. Indian food are relatively spicier, whereas Chinese food is less spicier and the Chinese enjoy seafood. Malay cooking uses coconut milk as their main ingredient, that makes their food very tasty.

Tourist Attraction

Nature Sightseeing
Singapore has a variety of parks and projects which often feature its natural tropical environment.The Singapore Zoo and Night Safari, allows people to explore Asian, African and South Americanhabitats at night, without any visible barriers between guests and the wild animals.Singapore has its Singapore Botanical Gardens open to the public that is 52 hectares large, and includes the National Orchid collection with over 3000 types of orchids growing.Recently the government has also been promoting the Sungei Buloh Wetlands Reserve as a quiet getaway from the stress of modern life.The Bukit Timah Nature Reserve is an extensive nature reserve which covers much of the Bukit Timah Hill, and is the only remaining place where primary rainforest still exists on the island.The Jurong BirdPark includes extensive specimens of exotic bird life from around the world, including a flock of one thousand flamingos.Pulau Ubin, an island offshore Singapore, is slowly becoming a popular tourist spot. The nature wildlife there is left undisturbed.

Night Safari
Set in a forest clearing, this 20-minute animal presentation will introduce you to nocturnal animals, from the elusive owl to nimble binturongs to intuitive civets. Watch, learn, be entertained and even be part of the act. The show also features a more interactive format where visitors will be drawn into the action. We don’t want to spoil the surprises so be sure to include this in your list of Night Safari things to do!

Come early to avoid disappointment as seating is on a first come first served basis. Show appearances/content may change due to the temperament of the animals. Do note that due to safety concerns (for both our guests and animals), admission is not allowed once the show has started

Show times: - 7.30pm, 8.30pm, and 9.30pm daily (weather permitting). Additional show at 10.30pm on Fridays, Saturdays and eve of public holidays.

Universal Film Studio
A theme park where visitors can be fully immersed into the world of movies and movie making State-of-the-art rides, shows and attractions that cater to all ages, from fun rides for kids to thrilling rides for teens and adults The only place where you can “Ride the Movies” One-of-a-kind attractions Based on well-known blockbuster Hollywood movies High-energy live-action shows to entertain the young and the young at heart.

Jurog Bird PARK
The Jurong Bird Park is the largest aviary of its kind in Asia Pacific, where over 8000 birds of 600 different species from all over the world call it home. The park is beautifully landscaped with the tallest man-made waterfall in the world to enhance the beauty of the habitat. Enjoy a firsthand experience of free-flying birds from Africa to South American in the largest walk-in aviary.

National Museum
The National Museum of Singapore is the nation’s oldest museum with a progressive mind. It is custodian of the 11 National Treasures, and its Singapore History and Living Galleries adopt cutting-edge and multi-perspective ways of presenting history and culture to redefine conventional museum experience.

A cultural and architectural landmark in Singapore, the Museum hosts innovative festivals and events all year round—the dynamic Night Festival, visually arresting art installations, as well as amazing performances and film screenings—in addition to presenting thought-provoking exhibitions involving critically important collections of artefacts. The programming is supported by a wide range of facilities and services including F&B, retail and a Resource Centre. The National Museum of Singapore re-opened in Dec 2012.

Merlion Park
The Merlion (Malay: Singa-Laut) is a mythical creature with the head of a lion and the body of a fish, used as a mascot and national personification of Singapore. Its name combines "mer" meaning the sea and "lion". The fish body represents Singapore's origin as a fishing village when it was called Temasek, which means "sea town" in Javanese. The lion head represents Singapore's original name — Singapura — meaning "lion city" or "kota singa".The symbol was designed by Fraser Brunner, a member of the Souvenir Committee and curator of the Van Kleef Aquarium, for the logo of the Singapore Tourism Board(STB) in use from 26 March 1964 to 1997 and has been its trademarked symbol since 20 July 1966. Although the STB changed their logo in 1997, the STB Act continues to protect the Merlion symbol. Approval must be received from STB before it can be used. The Merlion appears frequently on STB-approved souvenirs.

Under Water World
Embark on spectacular underwater journey through an 83m long moving travelator and marvel at over 2500 specimens of marine life from 250 different species around the region in the Under Water World Singapore. You can even feed gentle rays and sharks at the interactive pool, dine under water, and dip your toes into a Turkish fish spa. Have a splashing good time as you come up close to the intelligent pink mammals at the Dolphin Lagoon. Discover the various aspects such as their characteristics and husbandry behaviour. And under the guidance of trainers, learn how to give simple hand cues and watch the pink dolphins perform their natural abilities. Go on a dive guide lead programme that immerses you in the colourful world of fascinating deep sea denizens. Come nose to nose with sharks or keep your eyes peeled for the amazing mimic octopus, a master of disguise! The building also has a 150 seat theatrette that runs short films on marine conservation.

Sentosa Siloso Beach
There are some excellent beaches along the southern side of the island which are filled with activities on the weekends. Siloso beach is the most popular and crowded, while Palawan beach is fast catching upwith more and more beach bars springing into action. Tanjong beach is a relatively more secluded part of the southern coast if you prefer peace and tranquility. There are also some fascinating walking trails and range of other Sentosa attractions in the island for exploration if you prefer to be close to nature.

These famous Singapore tourist attractions and popular activities are a good start to a captivating experience in this tropical country! If time is not against you and if you look close enough, she has lot more interesting places to offer to its visitors. I am sure I will uncover more hidden jewels as I explore this tiny city.


Indira Gandhi Airport Delhi, India To Changi International Airport, Singapore - 6,057 K.M.

Hong kong
Hong Kong is a best city for travel with several sightseeing, restaurant, nightlife and accommodation.

Hong Kong is one of two special administrative regions (SAR) of the People's Republic of China, the other being Macau. It is situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea, it is known for its expansive skyline and deep natural harbour. With a land mass of 1,104 km square and a population of seven million people, Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Hong Kong's population is 95 percent ethnic Chinese and 5 percent from other groups. Hong Kong's Han Chinese majority originate mainly from the cities of Guangzhou and Taishan in the neighbouring Guangdong province.

It is also an important hub in East Asia with global connections to many of the world's cities. It is a unique destination that has absorbed people and cultural influences from places as diverse as Vietnam and Vancouver and proudly proclaims itself to be Asia's World City.

History
Archeological findings date the first human settlements in the area back to more than 30,000 years ago. It was first incorporated into China during the Qin Dynasty and largely remained under Chinese rule until 1841 during the Qing Dynasty, with a brief interruption at the end of the Qin Dynasty, when a Qin official established the kingdom of Nam Yuet, which later fell to the Han Dynasty.

In January 1841, as a result of the defeat of the Qing Dynasty of China in the First Opium War, Hong Kong Island became a British colony, under the Convention of Chuen Pi. After the defeat of China in the Second Opium War, the Kowloon Peninsula was ceded to Britain in 1860. In 1898, the New Territories were leased to Britain for 99 years.

When World War II broke out, Winston Churchill, the British Prime Minister, declared that Hong Kong was an "impregnable fortress". However, it was only a reality check for the British as most of their troops were tied down fighting the Germans in Europe, and Hong Kong was not given enough resources for its defence. As a result, after just slightly more than two weeks of fighting, Hong Kong was surrendered to the Japanese on 25 December 1941, making it the first time the British lost a colony to an invading force. After the war, despite American assuarances that Hong Kong will be restored to China, the British moved quickly to regain control of Hong Kong. However, they had lost their aura of invincibility and could not continue to rule Hong Kong the way they used to before the war, and all restrictions on non-Europeans owning property on prime real estate land were lifted. Hong Kong's post war recovery was astonishingly swift, and within 2-3 months, all post-war economic restrictions were lifted and Hong Kong became a free market once again.

After the communists took control of mainland China in 1949, many Chinese people, especially businessmen, fled to Hong Kong due to persecution by the communist government. Unlike the restrictive policies imposed by the communists in China, the British government took a rather hands off approach in Hong Kong, as proposed by former financial secretary John James Cowperthwaite, which led to a high degree of economic freedom. Under such conditions, businesses flourished in Hong Kong and its economy grew rapidly, earning it a place as one of the East Asian Tigers. In 1990, Hong Kong's GDP per capita surpassed that of Britain, the first time a colony's GDP per capita surpassed that of its colonial masters. Hong Kong is now the world's fourth largest financial centre after London, New York and Tokyo.

Tourist Attraction

The Avenue of Stars
The Avenue of Stars' main theme is the history and accomplishment of Hong Kong's film industry. Tablets for about 70 movie celebrities are set in the sidewalk, and there are about 30 pairs of handprints. At the entrance to the avenue is a big metal statue of a woman and a small stage for performances and activities.

The Avenue of the Stars is also a great place to see A Symphony of Lights, a spectacular light and laser show synchronized to music, staged every night at 8:00pm. This is the "world's largest permanent light and sound show" as recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records.

Victoria Peak
Victoria Peak has about 7 million visitors a year. It is the highest peak on Hong Kong Island with an altitude of 554 meters (1818 feet) and has been considered as a landmark of the island.

It is the best spot to have a bird's eye view of the Victoria Harbor and the whole thriving island. Viewed from the peak, the scenes are different between day and night.

During the day, you can see high and crowded buildings and the busy Victoria Harbor. At night, lit up by colorful lights, the whole scene is dazzling like a fairly-tale world. The best spot to enjoy the scene is the Peak Tower and the Lion Kiosk beside the Peak Tram terminal.

To reach Victoria Peak, you can take the Peak Tram. It was put into service in 1888. Its steepest point has an angle of 27 degree which definitely can give you an unforgettable experience

Repulse Bay
Repulse Bay's beach has become one of Hong Kong's most popular beaches because it is close to the city on Hong Kong Island and because it is relatively clean, cozy, has good public facilities like bathrooms and showers and is south facing. People on the beach can face the water and the sun, and the sun reflects off the glittering water and waves. People can walk to the nearby restaurants and get refreshments and swim out into the small bay that is watched by lifeguards during the regular season. The temperatures are perfect in the summer for basking in the sun and enjoying the cool water. The regular season extends from March to November. There are also statues of Taoist gods, a mountain backdrop, and expensive apartments near the beach. It is a free place to do some sightseeing and swim near the city.

The Wong Tai Sin Temple
The Wong Tai Sin Temple is a popular Taoist temple dedicated to Chinese religions including Buddhism and Confucianism. The founder of the temple said that the immortal Wong Tai Sin told him to build a temple at the site and also told him where to build structures and what to name them. He began to build the temple complex in 1921. There are several halls, temples and pavilions including the Three Saints Hall, the Bronze Pavilion that excludes women and girls, the Archives Hall, the Yue Hing Shrine that has a Buddha, a Confucian hall for the worship of Confucius, and a colorful garden called the Good Wish Garden. The complex has a library for Chinese religious literature. At times, there are hundreds of fortune tellers practicing at the site. People go there to get a prediction of their future, pray for happiness and worship the gods.

The temple complex is at the base of Mount Kowloon. According to the founder of the temple, the temple site is 3,600 paces from a pier in Kowloon. There are shops nearby where people can buy joss sticks, incense, and other things. The temple organization has a strong influence among some of the Chinese population in Hong Kong.

Man Mo Temple
It is the oldest temple in Hong Kong in the Mid-levels area of Hong Kong Island. It is half the way up Victoria Peak. In the temple, two idols are worshiped, the God of Literature and the God of War. It was built in 1847. People go to the Man Mo temples in China to pray for success in examinations or in their academic or literary endeavors. They also go to Man Mo temples to settle disputes. A bronze bell there was also made in 1847. Though it has been often renovated, the original appearance is preserved, and it is visited by lots of people.

It is said that the ceremony for settling disputes between people of cutting off a chicken's head and burning yellow paper originated during the Qing dynasty. In this ceremony, in order to avoid going to court, people invoke the gods to punish people who don't perform the vows that they publicly make in the ceremony.

Po Lin Monastery
The main distinctive features of this Buddhist temple are the Po Lin Monastery itself that is very active and serves delicious vegetarian meals in big portions, the very large Tian Tan Buddha that was constructed of bronze plates with an internal steel supporting framework and sat on a hill, and the Ngong Ping plateau that is about 520 meters(1,706 feet)high from which people can see good views of the island. It is near Lantau Peak and hiking trails if you want to do some hiking, and it is one of Hong Kong's most popular Buddhist temples.

Po Lin Monastery and the Tian Tan Buddha are both on a plateau called Ngong Ping. The Tian Tan Buddha is 34 meters tall (about 37 yards) and sits on a base on a hill. It is one of the biggest sitting bronze Buddhist statues in the world. The statue faces north-east towards Beijing. There is a stairway with about 260 steps up to the top of the hill. To reach the Ngong Ping plateau, you can take a tram. There are three kinds of tram cars to choose from. Tourists generally think that the glass-bottomed one is the best choice for the price since people can bypass long lines of Chinese tourists and the view is better

Lantau Island
Many visitors to Hong Kong are surprised to learn how big the territory is and that so much of it is sparsely inhabited. Hong Kong isn't just a big city. People are surprised to find some of Asia's best empty beaches, theme parks, resorts, and hiking places. Lantau Island is Hong Hong's biggest island. It is about twice the size of Hong Kong Island. While much of Hong Kong Island is densely populated, Lantau Island is mostly natural parkland with a big Disneyland theme park, the big Hong Kong International Airport that serves the whole region, resorts and small tourist attractions. There are a lot of hiking trails including trails going up to Lantau Peak and Sunset Peak that are the second and third highest mountains in Hong Kong. There are also quiet seashore areas and beaches that you can hike along. This combination of modern tourist facilities in a setting of parkland, beaches and hiking trails is rare in East Asia. Transportation to Lantau Island is now quick and easy from the city of Hong Kong since two Hong Kong MTR metro lines and the very big Tsing Ma Bridge now connect the island to the urban center.

Tsing Ma Bridge
In order to give access to Lantau Island where they were building Hong Kong's airport, the Hong Kong government built the Tsing Ma Bridge to connect Tsing Yi with Ma Wan across the channel. The bridge is the world's seventh longest suspension bridge, and it is the longest suspension bridge that is able to handle trains. It was an architectural achievement, and a part of the Hong Kong airport construction project that was considered one of the world's ten greatest construction projects that were completed during the 20th century.

It is 41 meters (135 feet) wide and about 2.2 kilometers in total length. The main span is 1,377 meters (4,518 feet) long. It has two decks. The top deck has a six lane highway, and the bottom deck can handle two trains at the same time.

Disneyland
Hong Kong Disneyland is located on Lantau Island, surrounding by mountains at three sides and facing the South China Sea. It is the smallest of the world's Disneylands resorts with an area of about 1.1 square kilometers or about 280 acres.

As the fifth Disneyland Park built in the mode of Disneyland and the eleventh theme park of Disneyland in the world, Hong Kong Disneyland Park is the first one take California Disney (including the Sleeping Princess Castle) as the base. On entering the park, you will be captured by the feeling of being in another world with countless excitement and adventures.

There are four theme areas in the Hong Kong Disneyland Park, namely, the Main Street, U.S.A, Adventure World, Fantastic World and Tomorrow World; all of them may bring you numerous fun and wonderful experience. On the Main Street, U.S.A, you can enjoy the typical old architectures from America, all kinds of classic antique cars as well as taste the delicious food from both western and eastern countries; in the Adventure World, along several broad rivers and through the African extensive grassland, in the mysterious Asian forest and at the Taishan Island, a brave pilot will lead you to explore the wonders and secret remote scenes of the great nature; the Fantastic World is a fairy-tale world full of happiness in your dream, and in it there are beautiful and kind-hearted Snow White, pure and lively little frying elephants, cute and naive little Winnie Bears, all characters in tales bringing you happiness and fancy; in the Tomorrow World, you can experience the thrilling trip in the outer space and explore the endless universes.

What's more, there are Hong Kong Disneyland Park Hotel and Disneyland Hollywood Hotel where you can enjoy to the most the fairy-tale world and movie world, surprised by Disney characters here and there.

Ocean Park
Hong Kong has two big amusement parks, and Ocean Park is the older of the two. It has an area of about 200 acres on the hills and shore of the southern part of Hong Kong Island. It is Hong Kong's favorite park, and attracts the most visitors. It is currently in the top 15 of the world's most visited parks. There are a lot of attractions related to displays of animal species such as dolphin shows and a jellyfish aquarium as well as big amusement park rides. The view of the sea along the coast is beautiful and fun when viewed high up on the roller-coaster rides or other thrill rides or the tram that passes over the sea that is a highlight in itself. Hong Kong Ocean Park can be a fun day with your family and friends.

Macau
Macau is a Special Administrative Region (SAR) of China. Located across the Pearl River estuary from Hong Kong, until 1999 Macau was an overseas territory of Portugal. One of the world's most densely populated spots, Macau is best known as Asia's largest destination for gambling taking in even more revenue than Las Vegas.

As the first and last European colony in Asia, Macau has more visible colonial history than Hong Kong. Walking through the old city you could convince yourself you were in Europe - if the streets were devoid of people and Chinese-language signage, that is. The Portuguese and Macanese population continues to maintain a presence, but most of the population is native Chinese.

Geography
Besides the city itself, Macau includes the islands of Taipa and Coloane, which are connected to Macau by bridges and to each other by a causeway, now built up into the Cotai Strip. The Chinese city of Zhuhai borders Macau to the north, and the border crossing carries heavy two-way vehicular and pedestrian traffic. The Zhuhai Special Economic Zone extends south to Hengqin Island, an area west of Taipa, Cotai and Coloane; the Lotus Bridge from Cotai connects to that area. There is significant movement by the local population of both Zhuhai and Macau across the border, making the two feel like twin cities.

Macau is subtropical with hot summers and mild winters. Visitors should note that typhoons often strike from mid-summer to Autumn which could stop many activities there. Although winter is generally mild, there are occasional cold fronts which could make temperatures drop 10°C in a day.

History
In the 16th Century, China gave Portugal the right to settle in Macau in exchange for clearing the area of pirates under strict Chinese administration. Macau was the first European settlement in the Far East. It became Portuguese colony effectively after the treaty signed by Qing and Portuguese Government in 1887. It was also the last, when pursuant to an agreement signed by China and Portugal in 1987, Macau became the Macau Special Administrative Region (SAR) of China on 20 December 1999, ending over 400 years of Portuguese administration.
China has promised that, under its "one country, two systems" formula - Macau is officially the same country with mainland China, but maintain its own ruling systems. Like its neighbour Hong Kong, Macau still does not have a full democracy and the locals often think that there is too much control or influence from Beijing (more one country, less two systems).

In recent years, Macau's economy has bloomed rapidly due to the opening of the gambling licenses. Thousands of tourists are in Macau each day, mainly from mainland China and neighbouring regions. The standard of living in Macau has as a result grown significantly, and in many cases, on par with some European countries. The tourist industry has also diversified - instead of casinos, Macau is also promoting its historic sites, culture and cuisine.

A Macao Narrative by Austin Coates. Great introduction to Macau's colourful history. You can buy this book at the museum in the Fortaleza do Monte which overlooks the Ruins of St. Paul.

TOURIST ATTRACTION

Ruins of St. Paul

The Ruins of St. Paul is the site of St. Paul Church. Construction of the Catholic church began in 1602. It was the greatest of Macau's churches, but it burned down in 1835, leaving only its very large and beautiful façade and the front stairway. It has an interesting history.

The church was built in 1602 adjoining the Jesuit College of St. Paul that was the first Western college in the Far East. Missionaries such as Matteo Ricci and Adam Schall studied Chinese at the university before serving at the Ming Court in Beijing as astronomers and mathematicians. The church was made of wood, and it was brilliantly decorated and furnished. The facade of carved stone was built in 1620-27 by Japanese Christian craftsmen who were refugees after the religion was wiped out in Japan. It was built under the direction of Italian Jesuit Carlo Spinola.

Monte Fort
Monte Fort, known as St. Paul Monte Fortress, Central Monte Fortress, or Great Sanba Monte Fortress, was constructed from 1617 to 1626. It was completed during the ruling years of Emperor Xizong in the Ming Dynasty. Monte Fortress played a very important role in defending Macao against the invasion of Holland.

Monte Fort is square shaped. Each side is about 100 meters long. The gate of the Monte Fortress faces southeast. The four corners of the fortress project out as bastions; its outside wall was built with rammed earth and thus very stable. The walls had many cutouts which served as supports for the 32 cannons used to defend against foreign attacks. Monte Fortress was a defense center in Macao at that time.

The walls of the Monte Fort are around nine meters high. The Fortress faces the NerWall in China which is only two meters high and has no supporting cannon facility.

A-Ma Temple
Barra Temple, also known as Tianhou Temple, Juehai Temple, and Zhongjue Buddhist Temple, is dedicated to Ma Zu, a fortune-teller in Putian, Fujian Province, during the Song Dynasty.
As a child, Ma zu showed a talent for forecasting the future. When she grew up, she became a nun, and died at the age of 28.

Legend has it that after her death Ma Zu's spirit helped merchants and fishermen head off dangers on the roiling sea. Therefore, local fishermen in Fujian constructed what was called the Barra Temple to commemorate her. Ma Zu was granted the honorific of Queen of Heaven, and later, during the Qing Dynasty, the Sea Goddess. The transom of the front gate of Barra Temple is engraved with the golden characters "Barra Temple"; the couplets at the two sides of the gate are respectively "Boundless Humanity and Generosity" and "Benefiting all Human beings". The temple is composed of the audience hall, stone hall, Hongren Hall, and Buddhist Pavilion, in traditional Buddhist temple style. The history of Macao and the Barra Temple are closely connected with each other.

Macao Wine Museum
Macau Wine Museum first opened to tourists on the Christmas Day in 1995. The museum is divided into three sections: history of wine production section, wine collection section, and wine exhibition section.

Walking into the Wine Museum, you will first find an oxcart carrying grapes and porcelain painting with grape garden and grape wine as its theme. At the back of the museum extends a corridor for exhibiting the history of vintage. Here lays various wares on the culture and development of wine vintage, ancient juice-squeezing devices, and different utensils of various shapes for containing wine. All display the history of grape planting and wine making of Ibérian Peninsula, especially that of Portugal countries.

After the corridor, tourists will find a wine cellar. That is the second section of the museum, the section of wine collection and exhibition. There are over 1100 brands of wine, over 700 of which are for sale and the left are the collection for show. Among all the collected brands, the most ancient is Boertu of 1815. You will also find many brands of Chinese mainland exhibited here.

Macau Tower
Macau Tower, the tenth tallest sightseeing tower in the world, is a member of the World Federation of Great Towers .

It combines sightseeing, a movie theater, a conference center, revolving restaurant, games machines and adventurous activities like the world's tallest bungy jump.

Macau Tower (Portuguese: Torre Panoramica), measuring 338 meters (1,109 feet) from ground level to the highest point, is taller than the Eiffel Tower in Paris.

Soar up to 233 meters (764 feet) above the ground using one of the three high-speed glass-fronted lifts, where an unforgettable vista awaits you at the observation decks. The 360° Cafe is Macau's highest revolving restaurant, offering a sumptuous buffet that caters to all tastes and an amazing view in all directions.

For those who prefer a thrilling experience, Macau Tower has five activities for you. Visitors can conquer Macau's highest summit (at 338 meters) and stand at the top of the tower by climbing 100 meters (328 feet) up the mast's vertical ladders, have a thrilling walk around the outer rim of the tower (233 meters above ground) with no handrail to cling to, or be a part of a Guinness World Record by taking the world's highest bungy jump from the 233-meter-tall platform. There is also the 233-meter SkyJump to the ground below and a 32-meter (105-foot) climbing wall.

Macau Marine Museum
The Macau Marine Museum has an aquarium, exhibition halls, a tea cafe, and a library with books and journals. Commander António Martins Soares, the Macau Harbor Master, proposed the museum in 1986. The museum was opened in an old house at the Largo do Pagode da Barra in 1987. Because more space was needed, a new building was built near the old house, and it opened in 1990. The new museum building is next to the Temple of A-ma. If you are interested in the maritime history of Macau or in ancient Chinese ship construction methods and overseas exploration, the Macau Maritime Museum is a place to visit.The building has four main theme halls: the Maritime Ethnology Exhibition, the Maritime History Exhibition, the Maritime Technology Exhibition, and the Aquarium Gallery.

The Maritime Ethnology Exhibition is below ground. This area is for instructing about the traditions and techniques of Macau fishermen. The exhibits have models of fishing vessels, demonstrate various fishing techniques, instruct on the customs and religions of the people, and display fishing implements. Videos show fishermen at work and their fishing techniques. There is a small theater that shows a film about the goddess A-ma.

Macau Great Prix Museum
Great Prix Museum was built up by the then Macau Government for celebrating the grand prix activity. It was unveiled on December 11, 1993 when the 40th Grand Prix Event was hold in Macau.

Macau Great Prix Museum exhibits the photos, articles, awards, and things of memorial value relevant to the Great Prix Event. The most attractive point of the museum lies in the exhibition of over 20 cars once participated in Prix competition. There are formula cars and motorcycles, and chariots driven by famous international drivers. The most renowned is the chariot and car-racing suit of Aryton Senna, the past notable driver who won the gold prize in the first Great Prix Formula Car Racing Event in 1983.

Puji Buddhist Temple
Puji Buddhist Temple is one of the three renowned temples in Macao. The other two are Lian Fong Temple and Barra Temple. Also known as Puji Buddhist Hall, it is the largest among the three. Built at the end of the Ming Dynasty, it has a history of around four hundred years.

Puji Buddhist Temple was built in a three-courtyard architecture style. The first hall is Daxiong Grand Hall. There are statues of Sakyamuni Buddha, Randeng Buddha, and Maitreya in the hall, and a huge bell made in the fifth ruling year of the Ming Dynasty at the gate of the hall. The second hall is Longevity Hall with a statue of Longevity Buddha inside. The third and main hall is Bodhisattva Hall. There are statues of Bodhisattva and the Eighteen Disciples of Buddha. The one on the left side looks like the figure of Marco Polo, a famous Italian explorer. Every year during the celebration of the birthday of Bodhisattva, many people come here to burn incense and pray..

Tour
Tour CodeNights/DaysPickup - DropPlaces
EFE 0013 N/4 D3 Nt Puerto Princesa
EFE 0023 N/4 D 1 Nt Manila, 2 Nt Banaue
EFE 0033 N/4 D 2 Nt Manila, 1 Nt Cebu
EFE 0043 N/4 D 3 Nt Manila-Tagaytay, Pagsanjan Sightseeing
EFE 0054 N/5 D2 Nt Manila, 2 Nt Angeles
EFE 0064 N/5 D 2 Nt Manila, 2 Nt Bohol
EFE 0074 N/5 D 2 Nt Manila, 2 Nt Boracay
EFE 0086 N/7 D2 Nt Manila, 2 Nt Bohol, 2 Nt Cebu
EFE 0098 N/9 D 2 Nt - Legazpi, 3 Nt - Cebu, 2 Nt - Boracay, 1 Nt - Palawan
EFE 0109 N/10 D 4 Nt Singapore, 3 Nt Malaysia, 2 Nt Lankawi
EFE 01110 N/11 D 3 Nt Manila, 3 Nt Banaue, 4 Nt Boracay
EFE 01211 N/12 D 2 Nt Manila, 3 Nt Puerto Princesa, 2 Nt Cebu, 4 Nt Boracay
EFE 01312 N/13 D3 Manila, 3 Nt Banaue, 2 Nt Puerto Princesa, 4 Nt Cebu or Boracay


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