LEH-LADAKH

Land of Haaf Moon

  • Leh Ladakh-
  • Tourist attraction-
  • General information-
  • Fairs & fastivals-
  • Getting to there-

ABOUT LEH LADAKH
Travellers flock to Ladakh from all corners of the globe. This trans-Himalayan district of Jammu and Kashmir has now become a favourite of both adventure freaks and culture enthusiasts. As a specialist Leh-Ladakh travel management company, we provide you with both destination and product knowledge and wish to offer you some great real life experiences during your holidays in Ladakh.

Leh, the capital of Ladakh is situated at a height of 3505 meters and is towards the eastern parts of Jammu and Kashmir. The region is watered by the Zanskar River, which flows into the Indus River just below. Spilling out of a side valley that tapers north towards eroded snow-capped peaks, the Ladakhi capital sprawls from the foot of a ruined Tibetan style palace - a maze of mud-brick and concrete flanked on one side by cream-coloured desert, and on the other by a swathe of lush irrigated farmland. As one approaches Leh India for the first time, via the sloping seep of dust and pebbles that divide if from the floor of the Indus Valley, one will have little difficulty imagining how the old trans -Himalayan traders must have felt as they plodded in on the caravan routes from Yarkhand and Tibet: a mixture of relief at having crossed the mountains in one piece, and anticipation of a relaxing spell in one of central Asia's most scenic and atmospheric towns. Leh in India is a beautiful destination with so many attractions and is the center of Tibeto-Buddhist Culture for ages. Its colorful gompas have attracted the devout Buddhists from all over the globe. Besides, it is also a favorite hiking locale and is known for some of the best hikes in the country. Travel to leh this vacation to enjoy its mystic beauty, nut before that acquaint yourself a little bit about the past and present of Leh India


HISTORY
LADAKH is a mysterious land shrouded in myth and legend. Much of its ancient history is known only through the mythology of its people as its written history is of very recent origin. Known for centuries as the 'land of passes' (La-pass; Dakh-land), Ladakh was described by Fa-hian, who travelled across its inhospitable terrain in 399 A.D. as 'The land where snow never melts and only corn ripens'.

Very little is known for certain about Ladakh prior to the 7th century. In the 7th and 8th centuries Tibetanisation of Ladakh began. Kashmiri artistic influence can still be seen in the wood carvings of the early monasteries at Lamayuru and Alchi, and early Kashmiri Buddhist bronze statues are found in several Ladakh monasteries.  At the end of the 9th century, central Tibetan culture began to heavily influence the history, culture and religious development of Ladakh. The rulers of Tibet, known as the Yarlung Dynasty, steadily expanded Tibet's borders, being strong enough to place a puppet emperor on the Chinese throne in 768 AD. Only when the Islamic kingdom to Tibet's west allied itself with China was Tibet forced to stop its military expansionism. Increasing tension developed between the followers of Buddhism and those of Tibet's earlier religious belief - Bon or Bon-Shamanism.  Tsong-Kha-pa, a famous commentator on Tibetan Buddhism (1357-1419) became the founder of the Gelug pa, or yellow-hat sect in the 14th century. His followers who came to Ladakh at the end of the 15th century, established Spitok, the first Gelug pa gompa in Ladakh. Other gompas already established in Ladakh gradually began to follow this new religious order

In the early 18th century, the king began appointing village elders to assist in ruling. This practice was probably the basis of the village headman tradition that is still current. Printing presses to produce religious texts were also introduced at this time. All religious texts are still written in Tibetan: further testimony to Tibetan influence in Ladakh.

In the 18th century Sikh rule was established over Jammu and Kashmir. A general in the Jammu army, Zorawar Singh, invaded Ladakh in what became known as the Dogra Invasion of 1834. Leh Palace was heavily damaged and the King of Ladakh retreated to Stok, where the family still lives (the most recent king was crowned in 1992). 


GEOGRAPHY
Ladakh is the largest province within the North Indian State of Jammu and Kashmir, covering approximately 60,000 square miles (100,000 sq. km). It is surrounded and bisected by some of the highest mountain ranges in the world. 

Its landscapes are forbidding by any measure. Snow-swathed mountains rise to several thousand feet above one of the most elevated plateux on earth. A treeless wind-swept country, much of Ladakh can be termed as mountains, Arctic desert, where everything is parched bt the rarefied dryness of the atmosphere. Scattered here and there, a few narrow fertile valleys provide a stark contrast to an otherwise barren, beautiful country of intense sunlight and clear sparkling air.

The limpidity of the atmosphere, in fact gives the night sky a unique clarity, so full and bright with stars that one feels transported to some etheral setting far removed from earth. For endless years, mad had even discovered this remote land, several hardy animals and birds lived together here in an exquisite equilibrium. Circumstances have now changed as they have almost everywhere else on the subcontinent. Today, Ladakh's flora and fauna are threatened and protection is vital if the ancient ecosystems are to survive the trauma of modern man. Through the fabric of this account runs a strong statement, that the armed forces possible contribution to conservation remains untapped. Harnessing this vital potential force may be the single most important conservation advance India could make in the battle to save what remains of its natural wealth.

Major Tourist Destinations LADAKH is situated between 30 degree to 36 degree east latitude and 76 degree to 79 degree north longitude. The region of Ladakh spread over to an area of 96,701 Sq. Kms and comprising a population of 2 Lakhs habitants and consists of two districts, Leh and Kargil. The region of Ladakh normally remains land locked between November to June every year as Srinagar-Ladakh and Ladakh-Manali highways, which connect Ladakh with the other parts of the country, remain closed during this period because of snow and rigorous winter.

Ladakh is also the land of many lakes and springs. Among the springs,the famous are the sulphar springs of Panamic(Nobra), Chumathang and Puga of Changthang ,which are famous for early curing of joints/rheumatic diseases. Many mineral springs are also found in some remote parts of Ladakh. People of region use the spring water as medicine to prevent and cure themselves from many diseases. The important lakes which fall within the jurisdiction of Ladakh are Pangong lake (150 Kms.long, 4 Kms. wide situated at a height of 14,000 ft.).

 

Tsomoriri lake, (Tsokar means salty lake). Since ancient times till the end of 1959 salt was being extricated from this particular salty lake for human consumption. Ladakh has two districts namely Leh and Kargil which stand in contrast with each other in terms of geography and climate. The great Himalaya mountain,lying to the south ,forms a barrier to monsoon in this area. Due to this region Ladakh is an isolated cold desert region. Altitude in Ladakh varies from place to place and is the main factor affecting local climate. The winter temp. touches as low as minus 30 degree(Leh & Kargil) and minus 60 degree in (Drass) subzero temp. prevails from December to February throughout Ladakh, whereas, zero degree temp. is experienced during rest of winter months. This result in freezing of all conceivable water resources. During summer the maximum temp. increases from 20 degree C to 38 degree C in July and August. The relative humidity is low and ranges from 31 to 64 percent.
 


Religion
The predominant religion in Ladakh is the Tibetan form of Buddhism, although Islamic influences are found from the Kashmir Valley as far as Kargil, and there are some Christian families in Leh.

The Tibetan influence in Ladakh is manifest: all religious books and prayers are in the Tibetan language, the monastic orders in the gompas are those developed in Tibet and the gompa artwork is clearly Tibetan in origin. Even the architectural design of Leh Palace is very similar to that of Lhasa's Potala Palace. Tibetan Buddhism is built on an earlier Tibetan religion - Bon or Bon-Shamanism - and it incorporated many of Bon's demons and gods. It similarly incorporated many of the gods in the Hindu pantheon, transforming them into Bodhisattavas or different incarnations or manifestations of various personalities.

The walls of Ladakh's gompas are covered with illustrations of the Lord Buddha, his manifestations and followers, and the incorporated Bon and Hindu guardian deities in their various incarnations. It all makes for colourful and varied wall murals in every Ladakh gompa.

The monasteries follow each of the two main sects of Buddhism that developed in Tibet: the Karyu pa or red-hat sect and the Gelug pa or yellow-hat sect. The Dalai Lama, believed to be a reincarnation of the Boddhisattva Avalokitesvara, is the head of the Gelug-pa sect. 

The gompas represent the monastic side of Buddhism, or lamaism. The lamaist side of Buddhism, requiring lon tation, contrasts with the everyday practice of Buddhism by Ladakhi lay people. 


People
The Mon, a term applied by Tibetan-speaking peoples to valley-dwellers, are probably the builders of many of the castles found in Ladakh, particularly those in the Zanskar Valley. The Mon were early Buddhists who derived their religion directly from India; thus, their form of Buddhism does not show the Chinese or Tibetan Tantric influences so prevalent in the later monasteries of Ladakh. Today the Mon are musicians in many Ladakhi villages, providing musical accompaniment to secular occasions such as social gatherings, parties or marriage ceremonies. 

The Dards, also agriculturists like the Mon, similarly arrived in Ladakh sometime before the 7th century and settled primarily in the Dras Valley. Having converted to Islam in the 17th century, little remains of their prior religious practices. Traditionally, the men's dress is a goncha, a long maroon or brown gown of heavy wool tied with a bright pink sash slightly below the waist, although any men now wear western clothes.

Women do not wear western dress as frequently; their goncha is slightly more fitted than the men's version, gathered into small pleats near the waist and worn with a brocade or goatskin cape (fur side turned towards the wearer) on the back. Alternatively, women wear a buckoo, a sleeveless wrap-around dress, although this is more typical of Tibetans than Ladakhis. 

Women usually wear their hair in two long braids and a Kantop, a sort of top hat with part of the front cut out. The Dard women of Baltistan wear distinctive head-dresses of orange ribbons curled to look like flowers, while Ladakhi women wear peroks - head-dresses with brown fur side flaps and a large band decorated with turquoise and coral reaching from their forehead to part way down their back.

TOURIST ATTRACTION

Leh Palace
The beautiful nine story 17th century palace was the residence of the royal family. The royal palace resembles a mini-Potala Palace. The palace house Buddhist paintings on walls and artifacts. On the top of the Namgyal hill, the palace has the Victory Tower, built to commemorate Ladakh's victory over the Balti Kashmir armies in the early 16th century. The palace was built for King Singge Namgyal, It serves as Indian Government's archaeological conservation organization office in Leh.

Leh Monastery and Gompa
The central area of Ladakh has the greatest concentration of major Buddhist monasteries or gompas. Of the twelve situated on or near the Indus, the oldest monastery is that of Lamayuru, which is believed to have been a sacred site for the pre-Buddhist religion known as Bon. The monasteries of Phiyang, Hemis and Chemrey were all founded under the direct patronage of members of the ruling Namgyal dynasty. Phyang represents an act of penance by the 16th century King Tashi Namgyal for the violence and treachery by which he reached the throne.

Spituk Monastery
The gompa stands prominently on the top of a hillock, 8 Kms. from Leh, and commands a panoramic view of the Indus Valley for miles. Many icons of Buddha and five thankas are found in 15th century monastery. There is also a collection of ancient masks, antique arms, and an awe inspiring image of Mahakal

Shanti Stupa
Shanti Stupa (means 'World Peace' in Japanese) was built by a Japanese who harbored the ambition of spreading Buddhism across the world, in 1985 with aid from the Japanese Government. It is located at Changspa, on the hilltop, and was inaugurated by Dalai Lama in 1985. Its state of the art work attracts a lot of tourists to Ladakh and is spectacular to watch. The stupa is connected by a ‘motorable’ road and a steep flight of stairs. Once on top, you can stop for a snack in the tea shop, then relax and enjoy the panoramic view of the chain of mountains and the peaceful little village of Changspa with typical Ladakhi houses built along a gushing stream, and the towering Namgyal Tsemo in the distance.

Namgyal Tsemo Gompa
The Namgyal Tsemo Gompa was built in 1430 by King Tashi Namgyal on Namgyal Tsemo peak overlooking the town. The monastery contains a three-story high solid gold idol of Maitrieya Buddha (future Buddha also called laughing buddha) and a one-storied statue of Avaloketesvara and Manjushri along with ancient manuscripts and frescoes. The fort above this gompa is ruined, but the views of Leh from here are breathtakingly beautiful. The associated temples here remain intact, but they are kept locked except during the morning and evening hours when a monk toils up the hills from Sankar Gompa to attend to the butter - lamps in front of the images.

Sankar Gonpa
The Sankar Gonpa is a couple of kilometers away from Leh town. It belongs to the Gelukspa school of Tibetan Buddhism. This small Gonpa is a branch of the Spituk Monastery, founded by the first incarnation of Skyabje Bakula (head monk of Spituk)

Shey Gompa
15 Kms upstream from Le, . the palace is believed to have been the seat of power of the pre-Tibetan kings. A 7.5 metre high copper statue of Buddha, plated with gold, and the largest of its kind, is installed in the palace

Soma Gonpa (Jokhang), Leh
The Ladakh Buddhist Association in 1957 built the small Gonpa opposite to SBI, in the main bazaar, which is open throughout the day for visitors. The Gonpa contains a statue of Joyo Rinpochey (crowned Buddha).

Leh Mosque
The striking green and white Leh Mosque, an exquisite work of Turko-Iranian architecture, stand in the Main Bazaar of Leh. This historical mosque was built in 1666-67 A.D. consequent to an agreement between the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb and then ruler of Ladakh, Deldan Namgyal. The mosque is open only to men. This is also a good place to find out about the possibility of doing voluntary work with various organizations. If interested, inquire at the reception centre or simply check the information board.

Stok Palace Museum
17 km from Leh town, this museum exhibits precious stones, thangkas, coins, royal crowns and dresses and prayer instruments.

The Nubra Valley
Known as a flowering den Nubra valley gets clad in endless bushes of yellow and pink wild roses. Once the valley is through with the season of roses around August, a carpet of wild lavender lies gently on it. Nubra is also a relatively warmer valley in Ladakh making it perfect for crops and fruits to grow. Diskit Village located near Khalsar, dotted with apricot plantations is one of the larger village of the Nubra valley. The road between Diskit and the quaint little Hunder Village winds through a gorgeous stretch of sand dunes. A quiet and pleasant evening can be spent amidst nature with snowcapped peaks in the background.

Pangong Lake
This lake is situated at a elevation of 14,000ft. In the Eastern sector of Ladakh, at a distance of 154km. from Leh across Changla pass (17,000ft.). This lake is one of the largest and most beautiful natural brakish lakes in the Country.


GENERAL INFORMATION

Location of Ladakh India
A land of freezing winds and burning hot sunlight, Ladakh is a cold desert lying in the rain shadow of the Great Himalayas and other smaller ranges. Little rain and snow reaches this dry area, where natural forces have created a fantastic landscape. Surrounded by rugged mountains this land is completely different from the green landscape of many parts of the Himalayas. Bounded by two of the world's mightiest mountain ranges, the Great Himalaya and the Karokaram, it is a land which has no match.

Formation of Ladakh India
In geological terms, this is a young land, formed only a few million years ago by the buckling and folding of the earth's crust as the Indian sub-continent pushed with irresistible force against the immovable mass of Asia. Its basic contours, uplifted by these unimaginable tectonic movements, have been modified over the millennia by the opposite process of erosion, sculpted into the form we see today by wind and water.

Water in Ladakh India
The main source of water in this land remains the winter snowfall. Ladakh was once covered by an extensive lake system, the vestiges of which still exist on its south -east plateaux of Rupshu and Chushul - in drainage basins with evocative names like Tso-moriri, Tsokar,and grandest of all, Pangong-tso.

Temperature in Ladakh India
The temperature rarely exceeds 27 degree celcuis in summer while in winter it may drop to minus 20 degree celcuis
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Administrative Divisions in Ladakh India
Made up of two administrative districts - Leh and Kargil, Ladakh covers a total area of about 59,000 square kilometers. Leh is the chief town.

People & Lifestyle in Ladakh India
Allied ethnologically and geographically with the Tibet region of China, the area has a predominantly Lamaist Buddhist population. It was nominally a dependency of Tibet. After 1531 it was invaded periodically by Muslims from Kashmir; it was annexed to Kashmir in the mid-19th cent.

However todays Ladakh which forms a part of the state of Jammu and Kashmir in India has some of its areas under the illegal occupation of Pakistan and China.


Influence of Buddhism in Ladakh
Buddhism reached Tibet from India via Ladakh, and there are ancient Buddhist frock engravings all over the region, even in areas like Drass and the lower Suru valley which today are inhabited by an exclusively Muslim population

The approach to a Buddhist Village is invariably marked by 'Mani' walls, which are ling chest-high structures faced with engraved stones bearing the Mantra "Om Mane Padme Hum" and by 'Chorten', commemorative cairns, like stone pepper-posts. Many villages are crowned with a 'Gompa' or monastery, which may be anything from an imposing complex of temples, prayer halls and monks' dwellings, to a tiny hermitage housing a single image and home to a solitary Lama


Women of Ladakh
In Leh area women of both the communities, Buddhist and Muslim, enjoy a greater freedom than other parts of the region. They not only work in the house and field, but also do business and interact freely with men other than their own relations. In Kargil and its adjoining regions on the other hand, it is only in the last few years that women are merging from semi-seclusion and taking jobs other than traditional ones like farming and house-keeping

Traditional Rituals & Leisure Activities
The natural joie-de-vivre of the Ladakhis is given free rein by the ancient traditions of the region. Monastic and other religious festivals, many of which fall in winter, provide the excuse for convivial gatherings. Summer pastimes all over the region are archery and polo. Among the Buddhists, these often develop into open-air parties accompanied by dance and song, at which 'Chang', the local brew made from fermented barley, flows freely

Wedding Process
There is a mix of music and dance, joy and laughter, in the air whenever a marriage is held. The first day is spent in feasting at the bride's house, the second at the groom's place. The bride goes to live in the house of bridegroom after marriage. Boys are usually married or promised for marriage at about 16, girls at about 12. To make a proposal a relative of the boy goes to the house of the girl and gives a ring together with presents of butter, tea and 'Chang'. If the gifts are accepted then the marriage follows some months later. The boy offers a necklace and clothes to the girl. The parents of the girl give the couple clothes, animals and land if they are rich. These gifts are known as a "Raqtqaq" or dowry.

Fairs & Fastivals
Festivals in Ladakh are celebrated as the occasions for merry-making. These festivals provide people with ample opportunities to interact with each other, form new ties and renew the old ones.

Many of the annual festivals of the Gompas take place in winter, which is a relatively idle time for majority of the people. These take the form of dance-dramas in the gompa courtyards. Lamas, attired in colourful robes and wearing masks, perform mimes symbolising various aspects of the religion such as the progress of the individual soul and its purification or the triumph of good over evil. Local people flock from near and far to these events and the spiritual benefits they get are no doubt heightened by their enjoyment of the party atmosphere .

Hemis Festival in Ladakh
Hemis is the biggest and most famous of the monastic festivals.Ladakh is a storehouse of culture and adventure. The Buddhist culture in Ladakh has been inviting travellers for ages from all parts of the world. Fairs and festivals of Ladakh are a perfect mirror to the cultural practices and traditions that carry on in Ladakh. The Hemis Festival of Ladakh is a major crowd puller and holds a lot of significance in terms of culture. The festival, which runs for two days, is celebrated to mark the birth anniversary of the Buddhist guru Padmasambhava. The festivities of Hemis take place at the world-famous Hemis Gompa, located at a distance of 45 km from the capital town of Leh.

The two-day-long festival falls on the 10th day of the Tibetan Lunar month. According to Georgian calendar, it is the time during June and July..

Dosmoche Festival in Ladakh
Dosmoche, the festival of the scapegoat, is celebrated with fervor at Leh. Falling in the second half of February, Dosmoche is one of two New Year festivals, the other being Losar. At Dosmoche, a great wooden mast decorated with streamers and religious emblems is et up outside Leh. At the appointed time, offerings of storma, ritual figures moulded out of dough, are brought out and ceremonially cast away into the desert, or burnt. These scapegoats carry away with them the evil spirits of the old year, and thus the town is cleansed and made ready to welcome the new year. Spituk, stok, thikse, chemrey and Matho all have their festivals in winter, between November and March. Likir and Deskit (Nubra )time their festivals to coincide with Dosmoche.

Losar
Losar -this spectacular festival celebrates the Ladakhi/Tibetan new year. Festivities last for 2 weeks during December or January,depending on the Lunar calander . All Ladakhi Buddhists celebrate it by making offerings to the gods, both in gompas and in their domestic shrines. The festival is marked with ancient rituals,the stage fights between good & evil, chanting and passing through the crowds with fire torches. The dance of the Ibex deer and the dramatic battles between the King & his ministers add to the joyous atmosphere. Full of music,dancing and merry-making ! This important festival changes location & dates every year.

Sindhu Darshan
Sindhu Darshan Festival, as the name suggests, is a celebration of river Sindhu, also known as the Indus. People travel for a Darshan and Puja of the River Sindhu (Indus) which originates from the Mansarovar in Tibet. The Festival aims at projecting the Sindhu river as a symbol of multi-dimensional cultural identity, communal harmony and peaceful co-existence in India. Whilst promoting tourism in this area, this festival is also a symbolic salute to the brave soldiers of India who have valiantly fought the odds at Siachen, Kargil and other places.

It is also an opportunity for people from around the country and overseas to visit the beautiful regions of Leh and Ladakh. Celebrated first time in the year 1997, the festival is organised annually at Leh in the month of May-June by the Government of Jammu and Kashmir with the support of the Ministry of tourism and culture, Government of India. The festival is kaleidoscope of Indian culture and showcases an exciting array of performing arts being brought together at an exciting place. As part of the celebrations, various groups from different states in India bring water from the other mighty rivers in the country in earthen pots and immerse these pots in the Sindhu river, thereby mingling the river water with other waters of the land.

Ladakh Harvest Festival
The festival usually starts from 1st september and lasts till sepftember 15th. It is a colourful celebration of the rich,cultural diversity of Ladakh's people. The weeks long festivities are held all over the region. Music, theatre, polo, archery,& wedding ceremonies,are performed daily along with mask and folk dances,with the final carnival parade passing through the streets of Leh.

Ladakh Festival The blend of various cultures of Central Asian, Tibetan, Northern India are found in Ladakh.The duration of Ladakh festival is of 15 days i.e From the 1st to the 15th of September.Various sports such as polo and archery are conducted. Folk dances and songs, its age-old social And cultural ceremonies, its art and handicrafts, all come alive in a colorful kaleidoscope.

Tak -Tok Festival
Tak-Tok festival is celebrated at cave Gompa of Tak- Tok . It is among the major festivals of Ladakh. Celebrated in summer, it is yet another tourist attraction. The festival is celebrated with fanfare and locals from far-flung areas storm the place on the occasion.

Getting to leh ladakh

By Air
Leh has the highest airport in India, it is Just 8km away from the city centre and well connected to Delhi, Jammu, Chandigarh and Srinagar.

By Rail
Jammu is the nearest railway stations i.e. 620 kms from Leh. The station is well connected to all major cities with few express and regular trains.

By Road
Leh - Shrinagar road is the main route to leh which include a night halt at Kargil. You can try the regular or the deluxe buses operated by the Jammu and Kashmir start road transport or you can take private taxis.
Tour
Tour CodeNights/DaysPickup - DropPlaces
LD 0013 N/4 D Leh Airport Pickup & Leh Airport Drop Leh, Monasteries, Khardungla Top
LD 0024 N/5 D Leh Airport Pickup & Leh Airport Drop Leh, Monasteries, Pangong Lake & Khardungla Top
LD 0035 N/6 D Leh Airport Pickup & Leh Airport Drop Leh, Monasteries, Pangong Lake & Nubra Valley
LD 0045 N/6 D Leh Airport Pickup & Leh Airport DropLeh, Monasteries, Sham Valley & Pangong Lake
LD 0056 N/7 D Leh Airport Pickup & Leh Airport DropLeh, Monasteries, Sham Valley, Pangong Lake & Nubra Valley
LD 0066 N/7 D Leh Airport Pickup & Leh Airport Drop Leh, Monasteries, Sham Valley, Pangong Lake & Khardungla Pass
LD 0078 N/9 D Leh Airport Pickup & Leh Airport Drop Leh, Monasteries, Sham Valley, Tsomoriri Lake & Nubra Valley
LD 0086 N/7 D Leh Airport Pickup & Leh Airport Drop Leh And Monasteries (Special Meditation)
LD 0097 N/8 D Leh Airport Pickup & Leh Airport Drop Leh, Monasteries, Sham Valley, Nubra Valley & Pangong Lake
LD 0106 N/7 D Leh Airport Pickup & Leh Airport Drop Leh, Sham Valley, Monasteries
LD 0119 N/10 D Leh Airport Pickup & Leh Airport Drop Leh, Monasteries, Sham Valley, Tsomoriri Lake, Nubra Valley & Pangong Lake
LD 012 13 N/14 DLeh Airport Pickup & Leh Airport Drop Leh, Monasteries, Sham Valley, Tsomoriri Lake, Pangong Lake & Nubra Valley
LD 01312 N/13 D Leh Airport Pickup & Leh Airport DropLeh, Tingmosgang, Lamayuru, Kargil, Zanskar,Padum & Monasteries
LD 01412 N/13 D Leh Airport Pickup & Leh Airport Drop Leh, Monasteries, Sham Valley, Tsomoriri Lake, Tsokar Lake, Nubra Valley & Pangong Lake
LD 0157 N/8 D Manali Pickup & Leh Airport Drop Leh, Monasteries, Pangong Lake, Nubra Valley, Sarchu & Manali
LD 0167 N/8 DSrinagar Pickup & Leh Airport Drop Srinagar, Kargil, Sham Valley, Leh, Monasteries, Pangong Lake & Nubra Valley
LD 0179 N/10 D Manali Pickup & Leh Airport Drop Keylong, Tsomoriri, Leh, Sham Valley, Pangong Lake & Nubra Valley
LD 0189 N/10 DSrinagar Pickup & Leh Airport Drop Srinagar, Gulmarg, Sonmarg, Kargil, Leh, Monasteries, Nubra Valley & Pangong Lake
LD 0198 N/9 DLeh Airport Pickup & Manali Drop Leh, Monasteries, Pangong Lake, Nubra Valley, Sarchu & Manali
LD 02010 N /11 D Manali Pickup & Srinagar Airport Drop Manali, Sarchu, Pangong Lake, Nubra Valley, Kargil & Srinagar


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